(Source: camkoa, via jellyfishclaws)

runrabbitjunk:

doodling something peaceful to the music on my doodle blog  u q u

runrabbitjunk:

doodling something peaceful to the music on my doodle blog  u q u

(Source: soutki, via perezosavolatil)

relahvant:

sykeopath:

what

ONWARD SEBASTIAN

relahvant:

sykeopath:

what

ONWARD SEBASTIAN

(Source: lavagoth, via perezosavolatil)

sofapizza:

Mary had a little Snoop Dogg

sofapizza:

Mary had a little Snoop Dogg

(Source: miwamari, via perezosavolatil)

(Source: thecraziethewizard, via perezosavolatil)

animal40:

contemporary art 

animal40:

contemporary art 

(via chyrme)

thebrainscoop:

Remember Martha, the last of her kind, who died on this day a century ago. September 1st marks the extinction of the passenger pigeon, a species of North American bird with incomparable population numbers before they were completely eradicated by humans at the beginning of the 20th century. 
3.7 billion to 0 in forty years.
And if you are wishing this wouldn’t happen again, hoping that history doesn’t repeat itself - remember that we are currently enduring the sixth major mass extinction event. While the other five in our earth’s history were naturally caused by everything from major meteoritic impacts, to extreme cooling or warming of the environment, and frequently changing atmosphere - the latest event, Number Six, is being completely attributed to humans. This is the Holocene Extinction. 
In 2012 the IUCN reported that 30% of amphibians are at risk of extinction; as well as 21% of mammals, reptiles, and fish, 12% of birds, 68% of plants. We are looking to lose 30-50% of all species of life on our planet by the middle of the century. 
This may feel like a hopeless inevitability, but the future is not set in stone. What we need for this cause is awareness. What we need is an investment of personal interest. We need voices, and students, and teachers. We need scientists, and law makers, and committees and new legislation for the environment. We need communicators. We need enthusiasts and what we really need is to ruin apathy. This is a shared planet, not just between ourselves but with every miraculous piece of life that has erupted on its unlikely surface in the last billion years. We owe it to that great improbability not to mess this up. 

thebrainscoop:

Remember Martha, the last of her kind, who died on this day a century ago. September 1st marks the extinction of the passenger pigeon, a species of North American bird with incomparable population numbers before they were completely eradicated by humans at the beginning of the 20th century.

3.7 billion to 0 in forty years.

And if you are wishing this wouldn’t happen again, hoping that history doesn’t repeat itself - remember that we are currently enduring the sixth major mass extinction event. While the other five in our earth’s history were naturally caused by everything from major meteoritic impacts, to extreme cooling or warming of the environment, and frequently changing atmosphere - the latest event, Number Six, is being completely attributed to humans. This is the Holocene Extinction. 

In 2012 the IUCN reported that 30% of amphibians are at risk of extinction; as well as 21% of mammals, reptiles, and fish, 12% of birds, 68% of plants. We are looking to lose 30-50% of all species of life on our planet by the middle of the century.

This may feel like a hopeless inevitability, but the future is not set in stone. What we need for this cause is awareness. What we need is an investment of personal interest. We need voices, and students, and teachers. We need scientists, and law makers, and committees and new legislation for the environment. We need communicators. We need enthusiasts and what we really need is to ruin apathy. This is a shared planet, not just between ourselves but with every miraculous piece of life that has erupted on its unlikely surface in the last billion years. We owe it to that great improbability not to mess this up. 

(via chyrme)

weloveshortvideos:

When you hit the blunt before you go on the air… 

(via spermspeed)

the-gingerdancer:

i feel like this is a real family photo

the-gingerdancer:

i feel like this is a real family photo

(via tigerlilylily)

princeowl:

that post that’s like ‘i’ll take aliens before i fuck around with what’s at the bottom of the ocean’ is So Real because like

the bigfin squid

image

image

we know very little about this weird hellish creature, we dont even know how big this thing is and it’s only sighted every couple years or so

fuck the ocean 

(via terraismight)

wedidthetimewarpagain:

she wears short skirts

i wear nothing because i am the disembodied incorporeal form

she’s a flapper

i am the eyes of T. J. Eckelburg

(via wasarahbi)

archiemcphee:

Did you know that we’ve been in the middle of a Loch Ness Monster sighting drought? Last year marked the first time in almost 90 years that Nessie hadn’t been spotted for an entire year. In fact, there hadn’t been any ‘confirmed sightings’ of the elusive cryptid for 18 months, leading some veteran spotters to voice concern that perhaps the famous monster had finally given up the ghost.

But wait! Something awesome just happened: Two different people, both using Apple Maps, captured screenshots of something measuring approximately 100ft long, with what appear to be two large flippers, powering along just under the surface of the loch. Experts from the Official Loch Ness Monster Fan Club have been studying the images and Gary Campbell, club president, reports that they’ve been steadily ruling out alternative explanations, leaving it increasingly likely that these images are brand new ‘confirmed sightings’:

‘We’ve been looking at it for a long time trying to work out exactly what it is. It looks like a boat wake, but the boat is missing. You can see some boats moored at the shore, but there isn’t one here. We’ve shown it to boat experts and they don’t know what it is. Whatever this is, it is under the water and heading south, so unless there have been secret submarine trials going on in the loch, the size of the object would make it likely to be Nessie.’

‘Now that we have spies in the skies above Loch Ness, maybe we will get more sightings which will whet the appetite of more down to earth Nessie hunters to come north. Furthermore, the use of satellite technology means that if Nessie is just swimming below the surface like in this case, we can still pick her up.’

Visit Dailymail.co.uk for additional information about this exiting development and the history of Nessie hunting.

[via Geekosystem and Dailymail.co.uk]

(via facelessoldwoman)

blo:

some of u guys rly need this 

(Source: floweringplant, via wasarahbi)

(Source: flust, via spenceralthouse)